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The following is a paper I wrote about the behavioral and psychological impacts of violence and covers some of the lesser-known effects. Though it can apply to violence committed anywhere; as you read it, think about violence committed in the workplace. Remember not all workplace violence is physical and that these effects can become the financial responsibility of the employer. Abstract The effects of violence are both physical and psychological. An act of violence against an individual is likely to affect not only the victim, but his family, his community, those who witnessed said violence, and even those who work with the victim to aid in his recovery. Once physical wounds heal, the victim may have debilitating angst and fearfulness, chronic depression, or anger. They...

Abstract Workplace violence may take many different forms; however, none grant as much immediate attention as an active shooter event. Also referred to as ‘active threat,' these events are the fastest growing and the most violent type of workplace violence. They can occur with little to no warning and on average, are over before law enforcement arrives. The psychological impact of such events is far-reaching and touches first responders, as well as the victims and their families.  These incidents can cost millions every year in lost production, sick days, mental health treatments, as well as attrition. The need to research the long and short-term effects has become apparent as attacks become more prevalent. This paper will review some of the more...

The Occupations Health and Safety Administration (OSHA) defines workplace violence as “… any act or threat of physical violence, harassment, intimidation, or other threatening disruptive behavior that occurs at the worksite. It ranges from threats and verbal abuse to physical assaults and even homicide. It can affect and involve employees, clients, customers, and visitors.” OSHA further states “Each employer – shall furnish to each of his employee employment and a place of employment which are free from recognized hazards that are causing or are likely to cause death or serious physical harm to his employees”. OSHA requires that every employer (regardless of size) provide their employees with an Emergency Action Plan (EAP). If you have 9 or fewer employees it can be...